Harry Thomas Tyler 1857 - 1940

  

by Jonathan Seymour 18 June 2016

  

  

This article reflects the life of Harry Thomas Tyler who was a marine engineer who worked on steamships that travelled around the world. He raised two families and he was also my great-grandfather.

Introduction

This is an account of the life of my great-grandfather Harry Thomas Tyler (1857-1940) whose life merits a detailed article for several reasons.  He was an ancestor who migrated from the East End of London where earlier generations had lived and worked to the then new developments in Ilford, Essex.  He worked hard all his life as a marine engineer on board steamships travelling to Australia and the Caribbean. He raised two families (his first wife died in 1900). He appears to be have been an exemplary character – he was a member of the Merchant Navy Mason Lodge and was much loved and well-respected by those who knew him. His life starts in the Victorian age and ends during the Second World War. He must have seen enormous technological and social changes in the world and been very much a part of it.

  

Acknowledgements

I am indebted to my mother Doreen Packard for making a number of personal effects available to me and for her testimony.  I am also indebted to the late Christopher Goodfellow for receipt of a number of personal effects that belonged to Harry Thomas Tyler and also to Laura Merrifield for sharing her research with me.

  

Abbreviations

GRO = General Register Office
RD = Registration District
HTT = Harry Thomas Tyler

  

Career as a Marine Engineer

There is a story in the family that two uncles of HTT (Harry Thomas Tyler) were taken by the press gang and never heard of again (specifically two brothers of Emma Tyler nee Cherry) (ref. 41). There is some circumstantial evidence for this from census records. If the household of John Cherry (Emma’s husband) is compared in the 1841 (ref. 42) and 1851 (ref. 43) census records, then in 1841 Emma does have brothers John (age 11) and Robert (age 13). In the 1851 census they are no longer recorded in the household.

  

It is interesting that both of Emma’s sons – James and HTT – went to sea as Marine Engineers. Whether their mother had any influence over this, perhaps in an attempt to find out what happened to her brothers, we may never know.

Harry Thomas Tyler's Apprenticeship Indenture of 1872 (ref. 31)

 

  

Harry Thomas Tyler's First Sailing as 5th Engineer to Melbourne in 1878 (ref. 31)

 


HTT served a 6 year engineering apprenticeship at Blackwall Iron Works as a ‘fitter and turner’ on the Isle of Dogs, starting at age 15 and finishing at age 21 - see above Apprenticeship Indenture (ref. 31). HTT’s overseas career started in 1878 when he set sail for Melbourne, Australia at the age of 21 as 5th Engineer on board the steam ship Garonne (see above Certificate of Discharge). This was the first of ten voyages to Australia on the steam ships Garonne and Chimborazo that lasted to 1882 when HTT was 25. By that time he had progressed to 3rd Engineer and spent the bulk of his time overseas. Examination of the Appendix (see later) shows the dates when HTT left London and returned. The long absences must have been very hard on the family left behind and particularly on his wife looking after the children.

  

Both the Garonne and Chimborazo were steamships of iron construction with one funnel and three masts that could be rigged for sail.  They both had gross weights of just under 4,000 tons, were just under 400 feet in length and could accommodate about 70-80 first class passengers, 90-100 second class and 260-270 third class passengers.  Both ships were built in Glasgow in 1871 (ref. 44).

  

In 1882 Harry was certified as a First Class Engineer by the Board of Trade (see below) (ref. 31) and worked on the steam ship Carib from then until 1888 steaming between London and the West Indies or Jamaica. If anything the intensity of work seems to pick up, with shorter turn around times in London, sometimes giving Harry just a few days with his family before he was sailing again for the Caribbean.

Harry Thomas Tyler's First Class Engineer Certificate 1882 (ref. 31)

 


Each time the ship arrived back in London, Harry was issued with his discharge paper for the trip. On every occasion HTT achieved ‘Very Good’ for Conduct and Ability on the back of the Discharge Paper, except for trip number 25 to the West Indies. On this occasion in 1886 an unidentified member of the crew must have stolen an item from the Master’s cabin. On returning to London every crew member had ‘Declines to Report’ on the back of their paper.

  

A gap occurs in HTT’s career from January 1888 when he returned on the Carib from Jamaica until August 1889 when he sails again. HTT received a letter of commendation from the Master of the Carib in January 1888, which also states that Harry was ‘leaving now for a situation at home’. (see below). It is unclear what this was. In January 1888 the household would have consisted of HTT, his first wife Alice and 3 children.

Letter accompanying discharge from S.S.Carib in January 1888 (ref. 31)

 

In 1888 HTT joins the Mason’s Merchant Navy Lodge (his brother James Tyler was also a member).  By August 1889 HTT was sailing again, this time on more local coastal routes or home trade routes on a variety of ships.

  

This lasted until 1891, by which time HTT had received discharge papers for his total of 33 sailings to date. Sailing number 33 (started in 1891 and ended in 1892) is the last one we have discharge papers for. At this point HTT was 35 years of age and serving as First Engineer (sometimes referred to as Chief Engineer).

  

After this the paper work for his career becomes less clear. There appeared to be a period of time working as a fitter for Stephens Smith & Co (Engineers and Electricians). Although we think that for most of the next 20 years or so (up towards the first world war) HTT served as Chief Engineer on the Steamship City of London (refs. 31 and 45). During the First World War HTT worked at the London Graving Dock Co Ltd on war work (see below) (ref. 31).

Harry Thomas Tyler’s First World War Service Certificate and Badge (ref. 31)

  


HTT was 58 in 1915. There is family knowledge that HTT ended his career working in the docks, which is sad given his great efforts and application since age 15. It is reported that HTT’s family were quite hard up towards the end of his working life and he is said to have had to work on into his seventies (ref. 41).

  

HTT’s son Victor Tyler said that his father took him on a short voyage when they went down one of the Belgium canals or rivers. The purpose was to encourage Victor to follow in HTT's footsteps - but although Victor was a natural engineer he was no sailor and was well known for getting seasick! (ref. 34).

  

Harry Thomas Tyler was believed to have finished his career working in the docks. This photograph is believed to have been taken at the docks with Harry on the extreme right hand side.

Harry Thomas Tyler at the Docks (ref. 31)

 

  

 Early Years in the Family of James Tyler and Emma Tyler (nee Cherry)

HTT (Harry Thomas Tyler) was born into a family of shipwrights in Poplar, East London. Both his father (James Tyler) and his grandfather (James Tyler) were born in Poplar and were shipwrights and would have worked in the nearby docks building and repairing ships in the 1800s.

  

In fact his father James Tyler had a varied and colourful career.  First as a shipwright in the 1840s; then as a Beer Retailer at the Vulcan Arms, Brunswick Street, Poplar in the late 1850s and early 1860s; then as a shipwright again in the 1870s and finally as a ‘General Dealer’ in wood and iron in the 1880s and 1890s which continued up until his death (refs. 1,2,4,5,6,9,28 and 29). HTT's parents married on 23 June 1849 in Parish of Bromley St.Leonard (Middlesex) and at that time James Tyler's father was deceased and Emma Cherry's father was a stockbroker (ref. 1). 

  

HTT was born on 23rd January 1857 at the Vulcan Arms, Brunswick Street, Poplar (ref. 2). He was James and Emma's fourth child, their 3 earlier children being : James John Tyler, Emma Rebecca Tyler and Catherine Margaret Tyler ("Kate") (refs. 18,19 and 20).  They had no further children as far as I am aware.

  

His father James Tyler was then in the Beer Retailer phase of his career. The Vulcan Arms is long gone and the only reference I can find is to a pub called the ‘Vulcan at 20 Brunswick Street’ (ref. 30).  Brunswick Street was close to the river Thames nestled between the West and East India Docks. It must have been an interesting location to live in 1857!  Not surprisingly it is now long gone, the whole of the docklands area having undergone major redevelopments.

  

HTT's mother Emma Tyler (nee Emma Cherry) was born in Hackney and was the daughter of John Cherry a Stockbroker who in turn was born at Spitalfields in East London.  HTT's father James Tyler was born in Poplar, although other research has shown that he had some Irish ancestry (ref. 33).  It was said within the family (ref. 31) that the marriage of Emma and James did not meet with Emma's parents approval, but that on bearing her first child they were reconciled to the marriage.

  

The household that HTT grew up in was very mobile. The census records from 1861 to 1881 showed James Tyler's family at a different address on each occasion and records from inbetween years (e.g. HTT's Apprenticeship records) revealed even more homes (refs. 4,5,6 and 31).  Addresses were centered around Poplar and Bromley-by-Bow in London's East End.

  

The 1861 census  (ref. 4) showed the complete family living at Brunswick Street, Poplar when HTT's father James was a Beer Retailer.  At that time the family had a servant Elizabeth age 21.  Sometime after 1861 census records show that their eldest son (James John) left home and went on to become a marine engineer.

  

By 1881 (ref. 6) HTT’s father and mother had separated. His father James Tyler (age 54 and still married) lived with HTT (age 24), now an engineer by trade and still a bachelor, and both of his daughters Emma (age 28, unmarried and a machinist) and Kate (age 26 and unmarried).

  

In 1881 (ref. 32) HTT’s mother Emma Tyler (nee Cherry) is to be found as a lodger in Limehouse, Middlesex. She is lodging with a family whose head of household was a shipwright from Sunderland and blind in one eye, along with his wife, their two children, two friends and one other boarder. At about age 55 she is earning her living as a needlewoman. One can only reflect how she appraised her life, starting as the daughter of a Stockbroker and now a lodger with another family, separated from her own family, still married and having to work for her own support.  Initial research suggests that she may have died between 1881 and 1891, however, this will be subject to future work.

  

  

Marriage to Alice Gentry and his First Family

The marriage of HTT and Alice Gentry took place on 3rd May 1883 at the Parish Church at Bromley St. Leonard, Middlesex (ref. 7). Alice Gentry’s parents were Charles and Eliza Gentry. Charles came from Braintree in Essex and Eliza came from Bocking also in Essex. Other research (sources not shown here) has shown that Alice Gentry was born in Braintree, where Charles and Eliza started their family. That of course is some distance from Bromley-by-bow in London so how did HTT and Alice meet?  Charles’ family moved on from Braintree, first to Reading in Berkshire and then to Mile End in London. So we do know that they were living in reasonably close proximity prior to their marriage.

  

At this time HTT was working as First Engineer on the steamship Carib travelling between London and the West Indies.  His Discharge Papers show that although he was married on 3rd May 1883, he sailed from London on 11th May 1883.  Not much time for a honeymoon!  He was then away until 13 July of that year when he returned home, but only for 3 days as he then left again for the West Indies on 16 July !  And so it went on.  A very hard life for both HTT and his new wife Alice who was left for long periods of time with a growing family to raise.

  

Charles Gentry is recorded as being a valvesman (at a gas works) (ref. 7), although census and other records (not shown here) indicate that he (rather like his counterpart James Tyler) had a varied career as a Silk Warper, Book keeper, Clerk, Upholsterer and then Gas Valvesman!

  

HTT and Alice Tyler (nee Gentry) had a total of 6 children over about 14 years :

  

    - Alice Emma Tyler in 1884-1885 in Poplar (ref. 21)
    - Harry Thomas [Junior] in 1887 in Poplar (ref. 22)
    - Arthur James Tyler in 1889 in West Ham (ref. 23)
    - Ethel Kate Tyler in 1890 in Poplar (ref. 24)
    - Victor Harold Tyler in 1896 in West Ham (ref. 25)
    - Frederick Walter ("Uncle Fred") in 1898 in West Ham (ref. 26)

 

HTT's family, like his father's family before him, moved location frequently - which can partly be seen in the different Registration Districts where their children were born (see above). There is a trend to move out of the East End of London and head further east where living standards were better.  Eventually the family would move as far east as Ilford in Essex, where HTT would remain until his death (refs. 23,29 and 33).  Ilford underwent a period of rapid development and expansion from 1891 to 1911 when the population of expanded from 11,000 to 78,000 (ref. 37).

  

There is a story in the family that HTT set up Alice Tyler (nee Gentry) with a small shop, maybe a shop selling oil? But there was a fire and it had to be closed (ref. 34). This is uncorroborated and we do not know when this might have been.

  

By 1891 HTT's household and his father's household are both in close proximity to each other in Bromley-by-Box (refs. 8 and 29).  At this time HTT's father James Tyler is 68 and is dealing in scrap wood and iron (ref. 9) and living with his two spinster daughters Emma and Catherine who are employed  as shirt makers.  Of course Emma and Catherine were also HTT's sisters. The census records show that HTT's eldest son Harry Thomas [Junior] was staying with the household of James Tyler.  Perhaps this was to ease the pressure on HTT's family and his wife Alice in particular?

  

As the 19th century ended and the new 20th century started HTT suffered a double blow. Firstly, his father James Tyler died on 2nd January 1900 at the recorded age of 79 (ref. 9) from old age and ‘apoplexy’ (the old fashioned term for a loss of consciousness that leads to death, for example, as may happen with a severe stroke). He was living at 204 East India Dock Road, Poplar, very close to where he had lived all his life and where his father before him (another James Tyler) had also lived and died. Secondly, on 5th August 1900 HTT's wife Alice Tyler (nee Gentry) died from heart disease, which apparently she had had for 2 months (ref. 10). She was 42 years old. This personal crisis of losing his wife would have been compounded by the practical reality of having six children to raise and the necessity of earning his living as a marine engineer. 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Going from left to right, the front row is Arthur and Harry; middle row is Ethel, Alice and Alice Tyler (nee Gentry) holding Frederick; HTT is standing and Victor is peeking out from the curtains.

Harry Thomas Tyler's First Family circa 1900

  

The above photo shows HTT and family taken around 1900 prior to Alice’s death. There is a family story that Victor Tyler was asked to pose in a picture as a boy but wouldn’t - but he did peek out from behind the curtains (ref. 34). This is the only photograph of Alice Tyler (nee Gentry) that we are aware of.

  

The events of 1900 must have been very hard to bear. The census in 1901 (ref.11) reveals how HTT got support from his elderly in-laws Charles and Eliza to help look after his large family living at 14 Kingston Road, Ilford, Essex.

  

The household of HTT in 1901 (ref. 11) ...


    HTT now a widower with sons:
        - Harry Tyler [Junior] (age 14) 
        - Arthur Tyler (age 12)
        - Victor Tyler (age 5)
        - Frederick Tyler (age 2)
    and daughters:
        - Alice Tyler (age 16)
        - Ethel Tyler (age 10)
    and In-laws:
        - Charles Gentry (age 69), no occupation and blind in one eye, born Braintree, Essex
        - Eliza Gentry (age 70) born Bocking Essex

  

  

Marriage to Alice Williams and his Second Family

In 1909 Harry’s household was still based at 14 Kingston Road, Ilford. Nearby lived Alice Williams as a spinster at 34 Jersey Road, Ilford. Her father Samuel Williams was a platelayer, someone who laid and maintained railway tracks.  Other research has shown that Samuel Williams and Alice Gentry were cousins (ref. 33). HTT met Alice Williams at some point, perhaps because of the family connection that Alice Williams had had with his first wife or maybe just because of their close proximity in Ilford or some other reason.

  

In all events, 9 years after Alice Tyler (nee Gentry) passed away, on 10 Aug 1909 at the Parish Church Ilford (ref. 12) HTT (age 52 ) married Alice Williams (age 27) in his second marriage.

  

HTT and Alice Tyler (nee Williams) had a total of 3 children over about 10 years :

  

    - Samuel John ("Jack") Tyler in 1913-4 in (ref. 14)
    - Ellen Ada Louise Tyler ("Nelly") in 1918 (ref. 15)
    - Kathleen Margaret Tyler ("Peggy") in 1923 (ref. 16)

  

We know from the 1911 census that sometime before 1911 the family moved within Ilford to 29 Howard Road. 

  

Apparently there were tensions between the children from HTT’s first marriage and the second family of Alice Tyler (nee Williams) and her children. However Alice Tyler (nee Williams) could not have had it easy at the beginning taking on HTT’s six children from the outset. Also some were at a difficult age (e.g. Victor would have been 13 in 1909) and discipline is said to have sometimes been an issue (ref. 34).

  

It is possible that HTT was also away from home for periods of time on sea voyages, however, this phase of HTT’s working life is less well documented than the earlier phase. So exactly when the sea voyages ended and working in the docks started towards the end of his career is unclear.

  

Although the bad feeling lasted a number of years, even when Victor Tyler had married and had his own family in Ilford, it is also known that there was a reconciliation in later years. Also Frederick Tyler (‘Uncle Fred’), HTT’s youngest child from his first marriage, never left home and continued to live with Alice, Nelly and Peggy long after HTT had died.

Harry Thomas Tyler in later years  

Final Resting Place

HTT died on 21st April 1940 at 29 Howard Road, Ilford at the age of 83 years old (ref. 17). His wife Alice Tyler (nee Williams) was present at the death. The cause of death was uraemia (kidney failure) and chronic hypertrophy of the prostate.

  

HTT appears to have lead an exemplary life and so he had purchased a Deed of Grant of Exclusive Right of Burial on 14th July 1937 from the borough of Ilford in relation to a grave at the Buckingham Road cemetery (Ilford) a few years before he passed away. Also this would have been just a few months after his son Jack had died earlier in 1937.

  

 

  

 

 

Harry Thomas Tyler is buried together with his second wife Alice Tyler (nee Williams) and their son Samuel John ("Jack") Tyler at Buckingham Road Cemetery, which is at Buckingham Road, Ilford, Essex (between High Road and Green Lane). It opened in 1881 (when it was called the Great Ilford Cemetery) and closed in 2002 (ref. 40).

  

Final Resting Place of Harry Thomas Tyler at Buckingham Road Cemetery - Ilford

 

Appendix - HTT's Career as a Marine Engineer from 1878 to 1892

This table represents information from the Discharge Certificates of HTT (ref. 31).  We believe he was a marine engineer at sea for another 20 years (see main article) or so.  Sailings are from London and "Start" and "End" represent the complete round trip from London to Melbourne etc... and back again.

 

  

 

Start

End

Role

To

Ship

1

25 Jul 1878

8 Dec 1878

5th Engineer

Melbourne

Garonne

2

23 Dec 1878

6 May 1879

5th Engineer

Melbourne

Garonne

3

12 Jun 1879

5 Nov 1879

5th Engineer

Melbourne

Garonne

4

24 Dec 1879

4 May 1880

5th Engineer

Melbourne

Garonne

5

24 May 1880

27 Sep 1880

5th Engineer

Melbourne

Garonne

6

22 Nov 1880

18 Mar 1881

4th Engineer

Melbourne

Chimborazo

7

8 Apr 1881

31 Jul 1881

4th Engineer

Melbourne

Chimborazo

8

15 Aug 1881

23 Dec 1881

3rd Engineer

Melbourne

Chimborazo

9

9 Jan 1882

13 May 1882

3rd Engineer

Sydney

Chimborazo

10

12 Jun 1882

15 Oct 1882

3rd Engineer

Adelaide

Chimborazo

11

2 Feb 1883

28 Apr 1883

Engineer (1st)

Jamaica

Carib

12

11 May 1883

13 Jul 1883

Engineer (1st)

W. Indies

Carib

13

16 Jul 1883

24 Sep 1883 ?

Engineer (1st)

W. Indies

Carib

14

5 Oct 1883

17 Dec 1883

Engineer (1st)

Jamaica

Carib

15

18 Dec 1883

16 Mar 1884

Engineer (1st)

W. Indies

Carib

16

2 Apr 1884

20 Jun 1884

Engineer (1st)

W. Indies

Carib

17

1 Jul 1884

23 Sep 1884

1st Engineer

W. Indies

Carib

18

2 Oct 1884

20 Dec 1884

1st Engineer

W. Indies

Carib

19

7 Jan 1885

29 Mar 1885

1st Engineer

W. Indies

Carib

20

8 Apr 1885

9 Jul 1885

Engineer (1st)

Jamaica

Carib

21

28 Jul 1885

21 Oct 1885

1st Engineer

W. Indies

Carib

22

Nov 1885 ?

14 Feb 1886

1st Engineer

W. Indies

Carib

23

20 Feb 1886

28 May 1886

1st Engineer

Jamaica

Carib

24

4 Jun 1886

20 Sep 1886

1st Engineer

Jamaica

Carib

25

27 Sep 1886

28 Dec 1886

1st Engineer

W. Indies

Carib

26

8 Jan 1887

15 Apr 1887

1st Engineer

Jamaica

Carib

27

19 Apr 1887

12 Jul 1887

1st Engineer

W. Indies

Carib

28

27 Jul 1887

22 Oct 1887

1st Engineer

W. Indies

Carib

29

26 Oct 1887

23 Jan 1888

1st Engineer

Jamaica

Carib

30

1 Aug 1889

12 Oct 1889

Chief Engineer

Coasting

Dandie Dinmont

31

10 Aug 1890

20 Jan 1891

1st Engineer

Home Trade

City of Ghent

32

21 Jan 1891

23 May 1891

1st Engineer

Home Trade

City of Ghent

33

24 May 1891

23 Aug 1892

Chief Engineer

Home Trade

SS City of Brussels

  

  

References

RD  = Registration District

GRO = General Register Office of England and Wales

(1) GRO, marriage certificate, Q2 Apr-Jun 1849, Poplar 2, 327.
(2) GRO, birth certificate, Q1 Jan-Mar 1857, Poplar 1c, 662.
(3) Census 1851, 6 Bedford Terrace, RD Poplar.
(4) Census 1861, 10 Brunswick Street, RD Poplar.
(5) Census 1871, 18 Railway Street, Bromley, RD Poplar.
(6) Census 1881, 103 St.Leonards Road, Bromley, RD Poplar.
(7) GRO, marriage certificate, Q2 Apr-Jun 1883, Poplar 1c, 882.
(8) Census 1891, 40 Venue Street, RD Poplar.
(9) GRO, death certificate, Q1 Jan-Mar 1900, Poplar 1c, 487.
(10) GRO, death certificate, Q3 Jul-Sep 1900, West Ham 4a, 118.
(11) Census 1901, 14 Kingston Road, Ilford, RD Romford.
(12) GRO, marriage certificate, Q3 Jul-Sep 1909, Romford 4a, 950.
(13) Census 1911, 29 Howard Road, Ilford, Essex, RD Romford.
(14) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q1 Jan-Mar 1914, Romford 4a, 1100.
(15) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q4 Oct-Dec 1918, Romford 4a, 756.
(16) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q2 Apr-Jun 1923, Romford 4a, 985.
(17) GRO, death certificate, Q2 1940, Ilford 4a, 684.
(18) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q2 Apr-Jun 1850, Poplar 2, 362.
(19) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q4 Oct-Dec 1851, Poplar 2, 384.
(20) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q4 Oct-Dec 1853, Poplar 1c, 582.
(21) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q1 Jan-Mar 1885, Poplar 1c, 634. 
(22) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q2 Apr-Jun 1887, Poplar 1c, 589.  
(23) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q1 Jan-Mar 1889, West Ham 4a, 110.
(24) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q4 Oct-Dec 1890, Poplar 1c, 569.
(25) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q1 Jan-Mar 1896, West Ham 4a, 100.
(26) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q3 Jul-Sep 1898, West Ham 4a, 211.

(27) GRO, Civil Registration Birth Indexes, Q4 Oct-Dec 1882, Braintree 4a, 612. 
(28) Census 1841, Wade Street, RD Poplar.
(29) Census 1891, 59 Teviot Street, RD Poplar.
(30) http://pubshistory.com/LondonPubs/Poplar/Vulcan.shtml
(31) Personal effects of Harry Thomas Tyler held by the family.
(32) Census 1881, 41 Salmons Lane, Limehouse, RD Stepney.
(33) Research by Laura Merrifield
(34) Testimony from Doreen Packard
(35) Census 1891, 189 Malmesbury Road, Bow, RD Poplar.
(36) GRO, birth certificate, Q1 Jan-Mar 1896, West Ham 4a, 100.
(37) British History Online - Victoria County History - Essex > A History of the County of Essex: Volume 5 > The borough of Ilford > Pgs 249-266.  http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/essex/vol5/pp249-266#s2
(38) Personal effects of Ellen Tyler ("Nelly") held by the family
(39) GRO, death certificate, Q3 Jul-Sep 1961, Romford 5a, 441.
(40) The East of London Family History Society
(41) Correspondence from Ellen ("Nelly") Tyler
(42) Census 1841, St Leonard Shoreditch, RD Shoreditch.
(43) Census 1851, Paradise House, RD Hackney.
(44) www.theshipslist.com
(45) Census 1911, The City of London (Vessel).